Equifax

Finance Blog

Credit Report FAQs: What Do I Do When a Family Member Dies?

Written by Diane Moogalian on August 16, 2010 in Credit  |   1 comment

Credit Report FAQs: What Do I Do When a Family Member Dies? By Diane Moogalian Credit accounts and debts may be the last things on your mind when a family member dies. But it’s important to think about these financial matters and know the proper…

Credit Accounts of deceased family members-how to handleCredit Report FAQs: What Do I Do When a Family Member Dies?
By Diane Moogalian

Credit accounts and debts may be the last things on your mind when a family member dies. But it’s important to think about these financial matters and know the proper steps to take so you don’t later find yourself untangling a mess of open accounts-or worse, fraud.

When a family member dies, what I do about his or her credit accounts?

You may need to pull a copy of the deceased’s credit report to see all the credit grantors and open accounts on it. Once you have that information, you can contact the credit grantors to close out accounts and report the tradelines as “deceased.” You may be required to show proof of power of attorney and a death certificate.

When you order death certificates, you may want to order 30 to 50 copies, just so you have enough to send later.

How do I pull a copy of my deceased family member’s credit report?

You may contact the credit-reporting agency and request a copy of the deceased’s credit file. You will be required to present a valid power of attorney or a letter of testamentary, which is a document provided by the probate court once a will is filed and the estate is in probate status.

Do I need to contact all of my family member’s creditors to close accounts?

Yes, contacting creditors to close out accounts and, more important, have the accounts reported as “deceased” is a wise decision to prevent misuse or fraud.

How is my deceased family member’s credit reported?

If you provide all of the reporting credit grantors with a copy of the family member’s death certificate, they will update their tradeline as “deceased.”

Will my deceased family member’s credit history be reported on my credit report?

No, your family member’s credit report doesn’t automatically show up on your credit report. If you have existing joint trades with the deceased, they will continue to be reported on your credit file until the debt is paid.

What scams or fraud issues do I need to watch out for after a family member dies?

The scams we most often see after the death of a family member involve stealing and misusing Social Security numbers to gain access to credit. In terms of fraud, misuse of the deceased’s existing open lines of credit can take time and be costly to discover and fix. To prevent such occurrences, you have several options:

I have the same name as my deceased family member. How do I make sure I’m not closing my accounts?

Before you call creditors, make sure you have all of the pertinent account numbers on hand.

What information do I need to provide to credit-reporting agencies and creditors? And what information should I NOT give out, to avoid scams or fraud?

Credit-reporting agencies and creditors will ask for personal information to verify your identity, such as your name, Social Security number, address, and account numbers. You should always be cautious about giving out personal information for identification purposes. When you call an agency or a creditor, confirm the name and role of the person you’re speaking with. Your Social Security number is a unique identifier and should be guarded to prevent fraudulent use by others to gain access to credit-a time-intensive and challenging issue to correct.

Here’s a good rule of thumb: If you call the creditor or credit-reporting agency, you’ll need to provide your account number and/or verify your personal identity in order to access your account or credit file. But if the creditor contacts you, you should not be required to provide personal identification information, as that information should already be on file.

Read More:

How To Dispute Credit Report Errors
Four Things College Kids Need To Know About Credit
Four Myths About Your Credit History
Debt Reduction: Why Paying Down Your Credit Card Debt Helps Your Credit Score

1 comment

  1. anika143 says:

    Excellent information. Can you also mention something about creditors wanting the deceased family to assume responsibility for the debt, and what their obligations are? This is information that will come in handy when a family is struggling with the many decisions and responsibilities they have to deal with. Good job.


Leave a Comment


Name :


Commenting guidelines

We welcome your interest and participation on this forum, but be aware that comments will be published at Equifax's sole discretion. Please don't use this blog to submit questions or concerns about your Equifax credit report or raise customer service issues. Instead, you should contact Equifax directly for all such matters and any attempts to do so in this forum will be promptly re-directed.

Some other factors to consider when commenting:
  1. Registration and privacy. While no registration is required to visit our forum, participants wishing to post a message must register by creating an account. All personal information provided by forum members incident to registration is governed by our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.
  2. All comments are anonymous. We'll delete your name, e-mail address, and any other identifying information, including details about your investments.
  3. We can't post or respond to every comment - As much as we'd like to, we can't post every comment, nor can we guarantee that we will respond to each individual message. All questions or comments about your Equifax credit report or similar customer service issues should be handled by contacting Equifax directly.
  4. Don't offer specific legal, tax or financial advice. All of the materials on this Site are for information, education, and noncommercial purposes only and this forum is not intended as a means of expressing views or ideas regarding any specific legal, tax, or investment advice. While offering general rules of thumb is both permitted and encouraged, recommending specific ideas or strategies regarding investments, taxes, and related matters is prohibited.
  5. Credit Repair. This blog is not intended as a venue for the discussion or exchange of ideas regarding credit repair or other strategies intended to assist visitors and community members improve or otherwise modify their credit histories, ratings or scores.
  6. Stay on topic. Your comment should be concise and pertain to the specific post in question.
  7. Be respectful of the community. The use of profanity, offensive language, spam, and personal attacks will not be tolerated and egregious or repeat offenders will be banned from future participation. We encourage disagreement and healthy debate, but please refrain from personal attacks on our WordPresss and contributors.
  8. Finally: Participation in this forum may be terminated by Equifax immediately and without notice for failure to comply with any guidelines or Terms of Use. As such, you should familiarize yourself with all pertinent requirements prior to submitting any response through the blog or otherwise. All opinions expressed in this forum are solely those of the individual submitting the comment, and don't necessarily represent the views of Equifax or its management.

Equifax maintains this interactive forum for education and information purposes in order to allow individuals to share their relevant knowledge and opinions with other members and visitors. We encourage you to participate in discussions about personal finance issues and other topics of interest to this community, but please read our commenting guidelines first. Equifax reserves the right to monitor postings to the forum and comments will be published at our discretion. Do you have questions or comments about your Equifax credit report or customer-service issues regarding an Equifax product? If so, please contact Equifax directly. All opinions and information expressed or shared in blog comments are solely those of the person submitting the comments, and don't necessarily represent the views of Equifax or its management.


Credit Archive

Stay Informed Sign up for our FREE Equifax email Newsletter