Equifax

Finance Blog

5 Reasons to Update Your Homeowners Insurance This Summer

Written by Eve Becker on June 4, 2013 in Insurance  |   3 comments

Summer is the perfect time for barbecues, pool parties and outdoor get-togethers with family and friends. Unfortunately, if you’re not properly insured, an injury on your property could be the end of your summer fun. Learn when and why you may want to consider updating your homeowners insurance policy.

homeowners insurance, insuranceWhether you’re hosting a barbecue, garden party, pool party, or family get-together, there’s nothing quite like entertaining outside in the summer. Many people, recognizing the value of an outdoor entertaining space in the warmer months, have upgraded their decks and patios to enjoy with guests in the good weather.

With all this outdoor entertaining, it’s important to ensure you have the proper homeowners insurance to cover your property in case of damage, and to help protect against any injury liability claims.

“The outdoor space is something that people don’t think about much. If they think about home insurance, they think mainly about their house structure,” says Amy Danise, editorial director of Insure.com.

You may want to review your homeowners insurance policy this summer if:

1. You’ve made recent outdoor improvements and they might not be included. If you’ve added a hot tub, pool, outdoor kitchen, gazebo, or storage shed, check to see if it’s included under your current policy.

Generally, other structures are covered as a percent of your dwelling coverage, Danise says. For example, if your house is insured for $200,000, the other structures on your property are typically insured for 10 percent of that amount.

2. Your outdoor property is in bad condition; you could be on the hook financially if someone is hurt on your property. Check the condition of your outdoor property to help protect yourself from injury claims against your homeowners insurance policy. Make sure your deck and stairs are in good shape. Look for any wood decay, which can weaken the structural integrity of your deck. Fix any areas that need work, and perform ongoing maintenance.

Be aware that some outdoor damage to your property may not be covered under your homeowners policy, especially if the damage could have been avoided with routine maintenance. Damage from termites, insects, birds, rodents, rust, rot, or mold may not be covered.

3. You may not have enough coverage to protect you in the event someone is injured during a summer get-together. Figure out how much liability protection you have, as this can protect you against property damage or bodily injury claims if, for example, someone is injured at your barbecue or hurt in a pool accident. The standard coverage amount is from $100,000 to $300,000. Talk to your insurance professional to determine if this is enough coverage for your situation.

4. You think it may be time to purchase additional coverage. Consider purchasing personal liability umbrella coverage. Because astronomical lawsuits are not uncommon, personal liability umbrella insurance provides additional coverage—on top of your existing auto and homeowners policies—in increments of $1 million.

“It’s a pretty cheap way to buy extra liability,” Danise says. “And it generally goes on top of your home and auto insurance.”

Umbrella policies go into effect after the main liability limits on your homeowners or auto policy are exhausted. So you will need to have a high liability, like $300,000, in your main policy, and then you can buy an umbrella policy to extend the amount, she says.

5. You aren’t taking advantage of available savings. Review your homeowners policy periodically to make sure you are familiar with its coverage and to ensure you are taking advantage of any applicable discounts. Don’t get caught by surprise. “Check on your deductibles to make sure you’re aware of how much you would have to pay out if you have property damage, like a fire,” Danise advises.

This summer, enjoy your outdoor entertaining space—just make sure it’s adequately covered under your homeowners insurance to prevent a dreamy summer day from turning into a nightmare.

A Chicago-based writer and editor, Eve Becker writes about personal finance, health and other topics. She is a former managing editor of Tribune Media Services.

3 comments

  1. RCN says:

    Homeowners insurance in many ways is legalized theft. Being a retired registered professional engineer (mechanical and civil) in 5 states (Illinois, being one of them)have found that estimated replacement costs of homes and associated structures are greatly over estimated. Document evidence of a lower estimate falls on deaf ears when submitted to insurance companies. Ms Becker, I know the Ill and WI construction areas very well.

    • CMC says:

      If homeowners insured their homes for the approximate replacement cost or what most people think would be the estimated “value” no person would be able to rebuild their home if they were to experience a total loss. It is unfortunate that the cost to replace a home is more than the current value but this the world we live in. As the cost of bread and butter increases so does the cost of bricks and lumber. With all do respect Sir as a professional Licensed Insurance Producer I would never try to tell you or anyone else how to do their job in regards to mechanical and civil engineering, and you should not place such judgment on a complex industry not of your own. The basis of insurance is the community protecting each other. We all put in to a pool and if you ever had a total loss or a pain and suffering claim, lost a limb etc. you would be very thankful to the community pool. The amount of money paid to insurance companies is always less than the amount paid out.

  2. carmen from georgia says:

    Great info.
    thanks


Leave a Comment


Name :


Commenting guidelines

We welcome your interest and participation on this forum, but be aware that comments will be published at Equifax's sole discretion. Please don't use this blog to submit questions or concerns about your Equifax credit report or raise customer service issues. Instead, you should contact Equifax directly for all such matters and any attempts to do so in this forum will be promptly re-directed.

Some other factors to consider when commenting:
  1. Registration and privacy. While no registration is required to visit our forum, participants wishing to post a message must register by creating an account. All personal information provided by forum members incident to registration is governed by our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy.
  2. All comments are anonymous. We'll delete your name, e-mail address, and any other identifying information, including details about your investments.
  3. We can't post or respond to every comment - As much as we'd like to, we can't post every comment, nor can we guarantee that we will respond to each individual message. All questions or comments about your Equifax credit report or similar customer service issues should be handled by contacting Equifax directly.
  4. Don't offer specific legal, tax or financial advice. All of the materials on this Site are for information, education, and noncommercial purposes only and this forum is not intended as a means of expressing views or ideas regarding any specific legal, tax, or investment advice. While offering general rules of thumb is both permitted and encouraged, recommending specific ideas or strategies regarding investments, taxes, and related matters is prohibited.
  5. Credit Repair. This blog is not intended as a venue for the discussion or exchange of ideas regarding credit repair or other strategies intended to assist visitors and community members improve or otherwise modify their credit histories, ratings or scores.
  6. Stay on topic. Your comment should be concise and pertain to the specific post in question.
  7. Be respectful of the community. The use of profanity, offensive language, spam, and personal attacks will not be tolerated and egregious or repeat offenders will be banned from future participation. We encourage disagreement and healthy debate, but please refrain from personal attacks on our WordPresss and contributors.
  8. Finally: Participation in this forum may be terminated by Equifax immediately and without notice for failure to comply with any guidelines or Terms of Use. As such, you should familiarize yourself with all pertinent requirements prior to submitting any response through the blog or otherwise. All opinions expressed in this forum are solely those of the individual submitting the comment, and don't necessarily represent the views of Equifax or its management.

Equifax maintains this interactive forum for education and information purposes in order to allow individuals to share their relevant knowledge and opinions with other members and visitors. We encourage you to participate in discussions about personal finance issues and other topics of interest to this community, but please read our commenting guidelines first. Equifax reserves the right to monitor postings to the forum and comments will be published at our discretion. Do you have questions or comments about your Equifax credit report or customer-service issues regarding an Equifax product? If so, please contact Equifax directly. All opinions and information expressed or shared in blog comments are solely those of the person submitting the comments, and don't necessarily represent the views of Equifax or its management.


Insurance Archive

Stay Informed Sign up for our FREE Equifax email Newsletter